High School Never Ends

reunion

During the 1980s I was visiting my aunt and uncle in the LA area.  My uncle told me about his fiftieth reunion which had taken place a couple of weeks prior to my visit.  He said, “Betty and I got all dressed up and headed toward the nearby hotel where the reunion was being held, but as we turned into the parking lot I looked at her and told her I didn’t want to see those people.  I wanted to remember them the way they were, not the way they are now.  We turned out of the parking lot and went to a restaurant and had a quiet dinner.”  This was surprising to me as they had been a power couple in high school and had attended all prior reunions – and enjoyed the events.

Yet, that’s how I feel about my class.  In the early 1970s we were young, fresh, full of life, and the opportunities lying before us were unlimited.  I want my memories to be of a bunch of fresh-faced seventeen-year-olds graduating from a brand-new high school.  When speaking to my wife I still refer to that building as the new high school.  My memories of the school are stuck in 1973 and perhaps it’s best for me to keep its people confined there as well. Continue reading

Retro Skiing

lookout lodge

Rolling into the Lookout Pass, Idaho parking lot at just past eight one Sunday morning I was startled by how few vehicles were there.  It felt as though I had traveled back in time and was arriving at Mt Spokane for a day of skiing in the late 60s.  Back then Mt Spokane had just two lifts and only the original old lodge number one.

I wasn’t sure what sort of experience this day was going to bring.  The lift ticket I had purchased in Coeur d’Alene was only $34, about one-third of what I am accustomed to paying in Colorado.  When I purchased it the vendor had apprised me that Fridays are Boomer Fridays and if you are past the age of forty you ski for $26.  Now that’s got to be one of the best ski bargains in the country! Continue reading

My Best Investmen Ever Part II

In the last installment I discussed what a terrific investment Microsoft ended up being for my family during a 20 year, and counting, holding period.  I really do attribute much of that success to the risky behavior of youth and pure luck.  But as has been said in the past, “I’d rather be lucky than smart.”

 In this post I will describe some income tax strategies I have used for my family in the past.  As a CPA and retired Certified Financial Planner I have more expertise than most in these areas; however, this post is not income tax advice which should be sought by you from an expert prior to trying any of these techniques. Continue reading

Super Savers and Too Big IRAs

Can you save too much in your tax deferred retirement accounts?  The short answer is, yes.  The longer answer is perhaps, but most Boomers will never have to worry about it.  The press is full of stories detailing the sad state of retirement funding for the Boomer generation and how they are woefully unprepared for what once was a distant retirement and is now upon them.  Only recently have I started picking up on articles dealing with the equally serious problem of families who have saved too much, or at least too much in tax deferred accounts. Continue reading

My Best Investment Ever

As a CPA and former Certified Financial Planner people often ask me for investment advice.  Please understand any advice given on my blog should be run by your investment and tax advisors prior to implementation.  Goes without saying, but I said it anyway.  My favorite question centers on what the best investment I ever made was.   My usual answer is Mr. Softy – Microsoft (msft).  It’s my favorite because my wife and I made a substantial investment in the company early in our marriage and held on for over twenty years.  This investment allows me to demonstrate risk and patience with the same investment.

In the early 90s not every desk had a computer on it and certainly most families had not yet purchased a home computer.  Though unless you were living in a cave you knew something of the Bill Gates story and recognized that personal computers were being purchased for office workers like crazy.  The reason I took the plunge was an article I read in a business periodical on hot Texas afternoon, more of a biography of Bill Gates really.  In the article he described how he had no intentions of getting into the pc business but rather wanted all of the pc manufacturers to use his software.  With every pc sold Microsoft would receive a royalty for its operating system.  As he explained it, there might be a dozen companies that fight it out in the pc marketplace, but it really didn’t matter to Microsoft who the winners were because they would win with every sale.  I bought his argument and a few days later purchased 100 shares of msft. Continue reading

Tiger 21- Financial Network

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Tiger 21, more formally known as The Investment Group for Enhanced Results in the 21st Century, is in large regard a glorified investment club.  It is an investment club with a $30 thousand annual membership fee.  Collectively, the club’s 230 members control assets valued in excess of $20 billion and have a median net worth $75 million.  I rather doubt anyone reading my Blog would qualify for membership.  Yet the truly wealthy are worth studying in terms of how they invest and what it is that motivates them to take action.  This is true because, as we have observed since the financial meltdown of 2008 – the rich indeed do get richer.  The wealth of the rich has recovered while the middleclass in America continues to struggle. Continue reading